Posts Tagged "Sexism"

“To the media at large, baseball fans of the female persuasion tend to be seen as vapid, bored, and distracted, either dragged along by boyfriends or there to party and pick up, all the while wearing their Victoria’s Secret Jays tees and drooling over Brett Lawrie. Women are there for a ladies night or a bachelorette party—certainly not for any “real love” of the game, yet they do come in handy as the occasional pretty face for Sportsnet to zoom in on.”

Stacey May Fowles, Watching Like a Girl

Read: TheWalrus.ca

thenationmagazine:

“Far from piquing interest in female sports, hyper-sexualized media images actually serve to suppress interest in—and respect for—women’s sports.”
— Mary Jo Kane explains her latest research on women’s sports and sexuality in our special Sport Issue. 

This seems to apply to woman in sports broadcasting/media also:
Women reporters still stuck on sidelines
"It has become, in many cases, a move toward providing male viewers "eye candy." But in almost all cases, it’s a defensive position to demonstrate that women are not excluded.
The position of sideline reporter, both on national and local telecasts, is dominated by women. 
Among this season’s first six ESPN college football crews — all male play-by players and analysts — all have been assigned a female as the sideline reporter. I guess a woman’s place is on the sidelines.” - Phil Mushnick, NYPost

thenationmagazine:

“Far from piquing interest in female sports, hyper-sexualized media images actually serve to suppress interest in—and respect for—women’s sports.”

— Mary Jo Kane explains her latest research on women’s sports and sexuality in our special Sport Issue. 

This seems to apply to woman in sports broadcasting/media also:

Women reporters still stuck on sidelines

"It has become, in many cases, a move toward providing male viewers "eye candy." But in almost all cases, it’s a defensive position to demonstrate that women are not excluded.

The position of sideline reporter, both on national and local telecasts, is dominated by women. 

Among this season’s first six ESPN college football crews — all male play-by players and analysts — all have been assigned a female as the sideline reporter. I guess a woman’s place is on the sidelines.” - Phil Mushnick, NYPost

“Here is Bryant Gumbel on the “coddling” of the fair maidens of the U.S. women’s soccer team, from his closing commentary on HBO’s “Real Sports” tonight:

“Finally tonight, can we stop coddling women in sports? Are we now so fearful of being labeled sexist that we can’t objectively assess the efforts of female athletes? Those are both valid questions that have come to the fore in the wake of the patronizing reactions that have followed the USA’s loss to Japan in the Women’s World Cup soccer final.

For the record, in the final, a very determined but unheralded Japanese team won the championship, upsetting a U.S. team that was heavily favored and ranked number one in the world of Women’s Soccer. En route to the loss, the American women failed to cash in on a wealth of early scoring chances, twice blew late leads with sloppy mistakes, and then got badly outclassed in penalty kicks.

Had a men’s team turned in a similar performance, papers and pundits nationwide would have had a field day assailing the players, criticizing the coach, and demanding widespread changes to a men’s national team that flat out choked. Yet the common reaction to this ladies’ loss were simply expressions of empathy for the defeat of the unfortunate darlings and pride in their oh-so-heroic effort.

Look, I have no desire to see anyone assail the women’s game or their athletes unfairly. But if the definition of true equality is treating folks honestly, without regard for race or gender, then it’s time we started critiquing women athletes in the same way we do the men. I’m sure some won’t like it, but blind praise is worthless in the absence of fair criticism.””

HBO’s Bryant Gumbel would prefer that we stop “coddling” the Women’s World Cup silver medalists. @sportswatch

Via Neil Best, Newsday

thepoliticalpartygirl:

@Record_Tara

Female reporters not allowed in the locker room at Augusta.

How can the PGA hold a tournament - one of the most important tournaments in the PGA Tour - at a blatantly sexist course? Millions and millions of dollars pour into Augusta’s coffers while it continues to discriminate against women. 

Last year, after the Tiger Woods sex scandal, Augusta National chairman Billy Payne said of Tiger, ”It is simply not the degree of his conduct that is so egregious here. It is the fact that he disappointed all of us, and more importantly, our kids and our grandkids. Our hero did not live up to the expectations of the role model we saw for our children.”

Well, Billy, I would say that you and every member of your organization continually disappoints your granddaughters (and grandsons) with your blatant misogyny.